Dakuku Peterside Scholarship Essays

December 3, 2017 14:22:00pm GMT      |      Views: 663

The Minister of Transportation, Rt. Hon. Rotimi Amaechi, being assisted by the Director Special Duties (External Relations & Technical Cooperation) of NIMASA, Hajia Lami Tumaka to present a plaque and a laptop in addition to an education grant of N500,000.00 to Miss Elizabeth Ezekiel.

Miss Elizabeth Ezekiel, a second year Medical student of the Ambrose Alli University Ekpoma, Edo State has emerged the winner of the Essay Competition organised by the Nigerian Maritime Administration and Safety Agency (NIMASA) to commemorate the 2017 World Maritime Day Celebration.

Miss Ezekiel's essay was adjudged the best out of 180 entries by an independent panel of judges on the topic "Connecting Ships, Ports and People" which is the theme for the 2017 WMD celebration.

She was presented with a N500,000.00 Education Grant, a laptop computer and a plaque by the Honourable Minister of Transportation, Rt. Hon. Rotimi Chibuike Amaechi in Lagos during the celebration of the World Maritime Day recently.

She was followed by David Adetula, a 200 level student of Dentistry and Dental Surgery of the University of Ibadan who came second and was presented with an Education Grant of N350,000.00, a laptop computer and a plaque by the Chairman, Senate Committee on Marine Transport, Senator Ahmed Rufai Sani.

The second runner up was Habeebullah Asudemade, a first year law student of the University of Ibadan who went home with an Education Grant of N250,000.00, a laptop computer and a plaque presented to him by Hon. Mohammed Umaru Bago, the Chairman of the House of Representatives Committee on Maritime Safety, Education and Administration.

Seven other students were also presented with consolation prizes of N100,000.00 Education Grant each by the Director General of NIMASA, Dr. Dakuku Peterside.

They are Ogochukwu Jesse, a student of Combined Arts University of Nigeria Nsukka, Angela Eze of Agricultural Extension, University of Nigeria Nsukka, Sarah Iortsor studying Chemistry in Benue State University Makurdi and Michael Adekanbi  who of the Insurance department, University of Lagos.

Others are Laurene Ekwugha studying Medicine and Surgery at the University of Nigeria Nsukka, Rukaiya Labaran of Physics Education department, University of Jos and Adekolajo Fasiku of the History Department, University of Ibadan.

Speaking on the sidelines of the event, the DG of NIMASA, Dr. Dakuku Peterside called on the winners to remain dedicated to their studies adding that "this reward is just one of NIMASA’s contributions to the development of human capital in Nigeria".

He expressed the hope that the Education Grant given to the winners will contribute in supporting their scholarly activities and challenged them to be prepared to contribute their quota to the development of the country upon graduation.

The essay competition which was open to only first and second year students of tertiary institutions in Nigeria drew entries from all over the country.

The exercise is part of the Agency's commitment to get youths involved in the Nigerian project in general and the intellectual discourse on harnessing the potentials of the maritime industry in particular.

Oh no, you spelled that word wrong! It happens all the time but mistakes like these and others can cost you free money aka scholarships. You wouldn’t want to miss out on $2,500 because you typed an “L” instead of a “Z” right? Well here are some common mistakes and tips on how to avoid them.

Fulfill the Criteria

Make sure you read the scholarship application description and follow the guidelines. If the scholarship asks you to write about a time where you overcame a struggle, don’t write about how your aunt’s cat is the most adorable cat. Be careful with copying and pasting other scholarship essays that you wrote - this could be a huge blunder if you replace it with the wrong topic. If the scholarship application says there is a maximum of 500 words, keep it to 500 words. Unfortunately, you won’t get any extra credit here for going over the word count.

Misspellings

We mentioned it briefly in the introduction but this is a very easy way to mess up your scholarship essay. One or multiple misspelled words show the scholarship reviewers that you didn’t take the time to proofread. If you’re competing against others for scholarship money, taking the time to proofread shows that you actually care about getting the scholarship. We suggest getting a second pair of eyes on your scholarship essays to check for spelling, grammar, punctuation, run-on sentences, and more.

Stay Humble

Although scholarship essays ask you to talk about yourself, they are no place to brag and boast. In acknowledging your accomplishments you should always carry a strong sense of humility. Scholarship reviewers are here to help support you and it helps if you have stories that reflect on how others in your community have helped you to achieve your goals. We’re all in this together and it’s hard to want to stamp ‘won’ on essays where people think they’ve got it all figured out themselves.

Stay Hungry

If you’ve experienced hardship in your life and your scholarship essays ask you to write about that, make sure that you write in stride. Try to tell your story in a frame that doesn’t sound like you’re complaining about your situation. How people write about their experiences can be very telling about how they deal with those experiences and reviewers of scholarships want to ensure that the individuals they’re supporting will use their resources to continue growing to advance themselves out of their situation.

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